Monday, May 22, 2017

The Baseball Hero Ate Broccoli and other notes


After an uncertain season, Jacob’s Little League team won their play-off game last night. He came out to the cottage afterwards, bearing a hot dog on a plate, and I gave him the buttered broccoli I had fixed. I cooked it out here partly because he likes the way I cook it—mushy beyond belief—and partly because his dad really does not like broccoli, so I thought I’d spare Christian the cooking odor. Jacob ate the whole crown by himself. So wonderful to find a vegetable he likes. Tonight, he came out when my dinner company was just leaving. Jacob was polite and cute, and when I turned around he had disappeared. I called his phone and asked if he had something on his mind, and he said no. I guess he just came to be here, and I’m so sorry I missed that opportunity.

My dinner guest, a colleague from TCU, brought me a chopped sandwich and potato salad from Heim’s Barbecue, a relative newcomer to town. I had been there once really liked the bbq and was overboard about the potato salad. It’s twice roasted potatoes, far superior to the potato salad usually offered in barbecue joints. Good dinner tonight.

I had an intimidating lunch guest today. She didn’t mean to be, but Heather is a lunch-time lead cook at Café Modern in the Fort Worth Museum of Modern Art. (I’ve been mistakenly promoting her to sous chef.) She’s also an old friend, who brought lunches and conversation to me when I couldn’t get out. I figured it was my turn to cook, but what do you fix for someone who daily cooks in an upscale restaurant? I settled on bean salad on toast, a recipe I’d found in Bon Appetit, I think.

Dishes on toast are quite the thing these days, and it makes me smile. When I was a child, my mom frequently served asparagus on toast or mushrooms on toast. She would not, I admit, have thought of beans on toast. I wanted cannellini beans but settled for pintos. I doubt my thoroughly midwestern mom even knew what a pinto was. But I made an oil and vinegar dressing, with lots of assorted herbs, mostly what I had on hand or in planter boxes, and soaked the beans overnight. Today I salted them, which made a huge difference. They were delicious. Served with a tangy avocado and cucumber and feta salad. Quite good.

The result of all this food activity is that I have more scrumptious leftovers than I can deal with, and I will be out for several meals in the next couple of days. Jordan and I thought we’d have a girls’ dinner tomorrow and make a dent in some of it, but Christian has a church meeting and Jacob has another play-off game. I’ll be eating leftovers alone. That’s okay.


4 comments:

Becky Michael said...

Your blog posts often make me hungry! My mom also made food "on toast," and I especially remember creamed asparagus (from the garden) or creamed salmon (from a can:) on toast. I didn't really like them, then, but would love to eat those meals now, especially if she was doing the cooking...

Randy Eickhoff said...

The Cafe Modern is one of my favorite places to eat. When I go down for an exhibit (at any of the three museums) I always start with lunch at the Modern. A true treat for little old me.

Judy Alter said...

Then you understand, Randy, why I was a bit intimidate to cook for someone who cooks there. She says I passed the test with flying colors.

Judy Alter said...

Becky, now that you bring it up I realize I make myself creamed tuna or chicken on toast for a pick-up meal. Hadn't thought of it in the same terms as asparagus, mushrooms, nd beans. But it seems too that our moms were ahead of their time in toast cooking. I'll try salmon. You might google recipes if you really have a taste for those dishes.